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Fostering Value in Your Organization

exeqfind | 19.07.2013

According to the latest Gallup Poll and the State of the American Workplace Report, only 30% of employees are engaged and inspired at work.  This is a pretty strong implication that the majority of workers are unhappy with what they are doing.  The report goes on to say that 52% are present but not excited about their job and the remaining 18% are actively disengaged.  In this kind of environment how can employers expect to stay afloat and pursue superior performance if basic principles of suc

According to the latest Gallup Poll and the State of the American Workplace Report, only 30% of employees are engaged and inspired at work.  This is a pretty strong implication that the majority of workers are unhappy with what they are doing.  The report goes on to say that 52% are present but not excited about their job and the remaining 18% are actively disengaged.  In this kind of environment how can employers expect to stay afloat and pursue superior performance if basic principles of success are neglected?  These statistics are remarkable given that we work in an age where there are so many retention initiatives in place.  Yet, it seems that despite these advanced retention strategies in place, the knowledge or brain drain remains high.   Interestingly, the report bears out that there is one key element to high retention rates that has little to do with perks and incentives.  That key element was tied to organizations that foster a culture that encouraged empowerment, collaboration and recognition.

An engaged and motivated workforce is as crucial as having the latest and greatest product or service on the market.  Having an interesting and beneficial value proposition for prospective customers is as essential as having engaged talent to support, sustain and reinvigorate continued business life cycles.

There are many business case stories of once untouchable market leaders having been dethroned by not following this simple math.  Value = Value Added + Waste.   By not being conscious and focused on what the customer is willing to pay for, there is no way to gain a proper understanding of value.  The common thread in companies that fail to understand value is that they assume customer conformance and taking value as a given on top of running month-to-month to create shareholder value.  Following this type of strategy will only result in those with an entrepreneurial mindset exiting conforming structures of traditional corporations.

Unfortunately, many companies follow this path.  Talent lacking empowerment more often than not will choose to exit and go where they can create a fostering environment elsewhere.  We have seen successful developments that came out of this traditional approach to convert into value adding enterprises through staying close to where the value is created by engaged employees.  Take Intel, for instance, a progressive organization created by non-conforming founders without the traditional corner office approach has sustained continued growth and extensive business cycles reproductions.  Intel’s Agile Development focus would not be possible if it wasn’t for the foundation established several decades ago and the sustained support of new leaders to continue fostering a collaborative environment.

How do you create value added without empowering your own to eliminate what doesn’t add value? Do you create a committee and command your talent development to enforce collaboration?  Or do you select a few trusted leaders on your staff to carry on with a value adding initiative?  You could and you might even gain some, but a continued culture of success is only driven by the top leader working side by side with the ones who have the knowledge: the workers doing the work.  The scenario of success is an engaged workforce solving problems hour by hour and their leaders coaching a culture of improvement in the shop, the beta room, the store, away from an office and the conference room.  In any environment you may expect success if you are engaging an engaged support structure where the work is being done….  where value happens.

Ed Bojorquez brings 27 years of experience in diverse roles and markets to his role as a senior consultant at Simpler Consulting.  Ed’s expertise includes product and process engineering, supplier development, global logistics and general business management in commercial, industrial, aerospace and automotive components and medical device markets in the US and Mexico.   Ed travels extensively throughout the US, Canada and Latin America advising and implementing continuous improvement programs for a broad range of organizations and industries.  Ed can be reached at (336) 601-9905

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